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If all goes as planned, what promises to be a fun spot where avid skaters and skateboarders can boost their own skills and challenge one another will be ready in midsummer.

Colin’s Dream Park is named in honor of Colin Anderson, a 12-year-old boy who was struck and killed by a pickup truck while skateboarding on U.S. Highway 17-92 in Orange City in February 2013.

Six years after Colin’s death, the fundraising for the park is complete, and the contractor selected by Orange City, New Line Skateparks Inc., of Langley, British Columbia, Canada, will begin work on the $200,000 project this month and finish in the latter part of July. The skate park will feature ramps and inclines for youths wanting to show their mastery of skateboarding.

The effort to raise money for a place specially designed for skaters began not long after Colin’s death. His mother, Casandra Sprague, raised almost $80,000, and Orange City appropriated some $20,000.

The idea of the park is to provide a safe place for skaters and skateboarders to hone their skills, without having to worry about vehicular traffic.

The other half of the cost of the park is being covered by a $100,000 grant from Volusia County’s Environmental/Cultural/Historic/Outdoor Recreation program, commonly known as the ECHO program.

— Al Everson

If all goes as planned, what promises to be a fun spot where avid skaters and skateboarders can boost their own skills and challenge one another will be ready in midsummer.

Colin’s Dream Park is named in honor of Colin Anderson, a 12-year-old boy who was struck and killed by a pickup truck while skateboarding on U.S. Highway 17-92 in Orange City in February 2013.

Six years after Colin’s death, the fundraising for the park is complete, and the contractor selected by Orange City, New Line Skateparks Inc., of Langley, British Columbia, Canada, will begin work on the $200,000 project this month and finish in the latter part of July. The skate park will feature ramps and inclines for youths wanting to show their mastery of skateboarding.

The effort to raise money for a place specially designed for skaters began not long after Colin’s death. His mother, Casandra Sprague, raised almost $80,000, and Orange City appropriated some $20,000.

The idea of the park is to provide a safe place for skaters and skateboarders to hone their skills, without having to worry about vehicular traffic.

The other half of the cost of the park is being covered by a $100,000 grant from Volusia County’s Environmental/Cultural/Historic/Outdoor Recreation program, commonly known as the ECHO program.

— Al Everson

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