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Around 2 a.m. Sept. 3, Volusia County sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to a home in DeBary regarding a suspicious incident.

While the lawmen were on their way, the person who called in the report — a woman who lives in the home — told “911 dispatch that someone was in her home and shooting.”

When deputies got there and began to approach the house, they heard a gunshot and sought cover.

Reinforcements arrived, and the lawmen convinced the woman who called dispatch to leave the building.

Then they spoke with a man inside the house, the one who, it turns out, had fired the shots.

He safely passed his shotgun out the front door and came out himself.

Inside the house, deputies noticed five shotgun slug holes in Shotgun Guy’s bedroom door, as well as “in the furniture used to barricade the door.”

He would later tell the deputies that someone had been trying to burglarize his home. However, there were “no signs of forced entry or any struggle that would indicate any other occupants” besides Shotgun Guy and the woman who lives in the home.

Shotgun Guy “advised deputies that he spoke to people who did not exist and in fear he barricaded his bedroom door to then hide in the closet.” And he fired several blasts of his shotgun through the barricade and through the bedroom door.

Whoa! Imagine if his rounds had hit someone.

The deputies Baker Acted Shotgun Guy and took him to SMA Healthcare for his own safety and for the safety of others. They also Baker Acted the woman of the house and took her to Halifax Hospital.

So who is most dangerous: people who aren’t there, or people who fire guns at people who aren’t there?

— By Keith Allen, based on local police-agency reports. If you have information about a crime, call Crime Stoppers, 1-888-277-TIPS. You could be eligible for a reward.

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